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Welcome to The Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics' website!


The Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics (CCDG) is under the direction of Dr. Mary Marazita, Associate Dean of Research, Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Oral Biology here at the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. Marazita's research focuses on the human genetics of complex traits, specifically, birth defects (primarily cleft lip, cleft palate and other craniofacial anomalies), oral health, preterm birth, and other complex phenotypes. A major current focus is genetic (genome-wide association and linkage studies) and phenotypic studies of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Asia, South America, Europe and the U.S.A An important aspect of these studies is expanding the phenotype of orofacial clefting within families to include sub-clinical features. A second major focus is investigating factors contributing to oral health disparities, for example genetic, microbiological and epidemiological factors contributing to dental caries and other oral health phenotypes in Appalachia and other U.S. and international sites. Dr. Marazita also has numerous outside collaborations in the genetics of diverse human disorders (for example premature birth, myopia, dental traits).

For more detailed information about the current research projects of the CCDG, click the "Projects" tab above.

For a full listing of University Faculty associated with the CCDG, click the "Faculty" tab above.

For a full listing of University Staff associated with the CCDG, click the "Staff" tab above.

News!!

Welcome to Cristy Spino (left), the new FaceBase Research Software Development Manager!


Congratulations to Trish Parsons (left) on receiving the first Cranie Award* for her recent grant award! Trish's grant is from The Cleft Palate Foundation to study the gene-environment interaction between hypoxia (lack of oxygen) and cleft lip/palate. She will use a cleft-susceptible mouse strain and expose pregnant mothers to atmospheric oxygen levels similar to those of high-altitude populations. Their litters will then be compared to those born of mothers exposed to normal oxygen levels.

*The Cranie Award is a prestigious trophy presented to a CCDG faculty or staff member in recognition of outstanding performance or exceptional achievement within the field of craniofacial or dental genetics.









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University of Pittsburgh
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Phone: 412-624-4141
Website development by Michael G. DeSensi, CCDG